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1. . 850

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Bowl with Leg-shaped Handle. Attica (Greece), acquired in Munich in 1909
Clay, around 850 BC, Attic, Early Geometric
Napf mit beinförmigem Griff
Attika (Griechenland), 1909 in München erworben
Ton, um 850 v. Chr., attisch, fr¨hgeometrisch
V.I. 4984
27 2015




2. Votive Relief for a Chariot Victory

Skala Oropou (Attica/Greece), acquired in 1884
Marble, 400 390 BC
The magnificent votive relief from the sanctuary of Amphiaraus in Oropos (northern Attica) displays a chariot race honouring this local healing hero. The nude warrior wearing a helmet next to the bearded charioteer is about to jump off the speeding chariot to continue the race on foot
SK 725
27 2015




3. Votive Relief for Hermes and the Nymphs

Rome (Italy), Quirinal Hill, acquired in 1889
Marble, 410 400 BC
As is often the case with Greek votive reliefs, an illusion is made to a landscape scenery. In a grotto on a right we see the river god Achelousas a bull with a human head, above him the crossed goats legs of Pan. In front of the cave, Hermes leads three dancing nymphs. To the left stands the worshipping donator
SK 709a
27 2015




4. Pyxis (Box) with Not Belonging Lid

Thebes/Boeotia (Greece), acquired in 1887
Clay, 750 725 BC
V.I. 3143,1
27 2015

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27 2015




6. Amphora with Depiction of a Funerary Procession (Ekphora)

Acquired in Athens in 1942
Clay, 730 720 BC, Attic
Inv. 1986.10
27 2015


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7. Amphora with Procession of Warriors, Mourners

Attica (Greece), acquired in 1891
Clay, 720 700 BC, Attic
V.I. 3203
27 2015




8. Trefoil Jug with Horse Leader, Animals, Boxers

Aegina (Greece), acquired in 1896
Clay, around 730 BC, Attic
V.I. 3374
27 2015




9. Amphora with Depictions of Animals

Attica (Greece), acquired in 1925
Clay, around 720 BC, Attic
Inv 31005
27 2015




10. Krater (Wine-mixing Bowl) on a High Foot

Island of Milos (Greece), acquired in 1903
Clay, 750 - 700 BC, Workshop in Argos
This monumental clay vessel probably served as a tomb marker (sema). Its geometric decoration is made to align with the vase body. These symbolically combined depiction of humans and animals are contained in square fields alternating with differently filled stripes of geometric decor
V.I.4286
27 2015




11. Trypod, Box (Pointed Pyxis; Lid Not Belonging)

Attica (Greece), acquired in Munich in 1909
Clay, around 850 BC, Attic, Early Geometric
V.I.4988, 4988a
27 2015




12. Fragment of a Musical Instrument (?); So Called Swan Goddess

Ephesus (Turkey), acquired in 1964
Ivory, 650 - 600 BC, Lydian
A woman wearing a high head-dress, veil and ear-rings stands on a sphinx, the upper end culminating in a swans neck/ This probably was part of a device, possibly a kithara (lyre), Which was played during cultic rituals. The style is indicative of models from the Ancient Near East and from Egypt
27 2015

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13. 12 14. Corinthian Ceramics: Ointment Vessels, Pyxis (Box)

Rhodes, Corinth (Greece), acquired in 1880, 1901 and 1902 respectively
Clay, around 680 - 660 BC; around 640 BC; around 600 - 575 BC
F 336; V.I. 3773; V.I. 4507
27 2015

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) 14. Corinthian Ceramics: Pyxis (Box)
Rhodes, Corinth (Greece), acquired in 1902
Clay, around 600 - 575 BC
V.I. 4507




14. Greeks Bronze Helmets from the Seventh Century BC

Greece, Italy, Egypt; acquired 1904 - 05
Bronze, 700 - 600 BC
Metal helmets constituted an important element in Hoplite armour. Over the centuries, they developed and differentiated into various types; the Corinthian and the so-called Illiryan type are among the oldest. The forehead, nose and cheek protection of Corinthian helmets often was decorated with relief. The shell was usually decorated with a horsehair crest. After successful battle, helmets sometimes were rendered useless by bending them and offered in sanctuaries as an expression of gratitude to the gods. The greater part of helmets in the holdings of the Berlin Collection of Classical Antiquities goes back to the endowment by the publisher and art collector Franz von Lipperheide in 1905
27 2015

) Misc. 10575 (Illyrisch, angeblich aus Agypten), L 8, L 6, L 10, L3, L5 (korinthicsh, L 6 und L 8 aus Olympia [ ]




) L 3 (korinthicsh)




) L 3 (korinthicsh)




) L 10 (korinthicsh)




) L 31 (Illyrisch); L 9, L 20, L 13, L 92 (korinthicsh, L 13 und L 92 aus Olympia); L 33 (Illyrisch)




) L 31 (Illyrisch)




15. Relief with Heroes and Worshippers

Chrysapha/Sparta (Greece), acquired from the Sabouroff Collection;
Marble, around 540 BC
This monument is the oldest of the Laconian hero reliefs, It depicts heroised deceased with distinct attributes of their removed status (throne, snake, receptacle for offerings, worshippers). It is also suggested by inscriptions that the tumuli of Spartan heroes were crowned by reliefs of this kind
Sk 731
27 2015




16. Votive Relief with Female Figure

Miletus (Turkey); from the division of finds of the Miletus excavation;
Marble, around 575 BC
The relief represents a woman with a relatively large head in a box-like frame. She wears a long chiton and a small jacket-like cloak. Her hair is covered by a veil with a cap-like element. The fragment belong to the oldest representations of this Ionic female type in Miletus
Sk 1792
27 2015




17. Statue of a Woman with a Hare as Votive Offering

Samos (Greece), sanctuary of Hera; from the division of finds of the excavation 1914
Marble, around 560 BC
Statues of lavishly dressed young girls (korai) were placed on tombs or consecrated to the gods. This kore can be recognized as an offering due to the inscription: Cheramyes has erected me, an extremely beautiful statue, for the goddess. She holds a hare in her hand as a votive offering
Sk 1750
27 2015

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18. Upper Body of a Girl Statue

Chalkedon (Turkey), acquired in Istanbul in 1907
Marble, around 550 BC
The girls hair is held by a wind band decorated with meanders and there is rosette-shaped jewellery on her ears. The wide open eyes and the garment style are reminiscent od Greek mainland workshop. The sculpting is fresh yet provincial
Sk 1651
27 2015

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19. Votive Tablets from Penteskouphia

In 1879, over a thousand fragments of archaic small clay tablets were found in Penteskouphia near Corinth. They were originally hung in a sanctuary of the sea god Poseidon and his wife Amphitrite and later deposited at the site after they had been broken. The fronts depict either the gods themselves or motifs that were supposed to have delighted them, more rarely also mythological scenes. On the reverse sides, the potters frequently portrayed themselves at work. A few of the potters, such as Timonidas working around 580 BC, even signed the tablets. Importantly, the clay tablets show how this socially subordinated group of labourers saw themselves. They provide an insight into religious thoughts that are characterized by a very direct relationship with the god concerned: the tablets were fired together with the vessels. If the firing was successful, then the tablets were brought into the shrine and consecrated as a present for the gods

TOP
Horsemen
F 541, 552, 855, 630+539, 565; V.I. 3922

CENTRE, from left to right
Bird, panther, bull
F 816, 921, 727
Hunter with painters name Timonidas
F 846 B
Warriors
F 588, 847 B, 603
Horsemen, horse leader, horse
F 907 B, 557, 566

BOTTOM
Dolphin rider, horse in water, bull, pugilists, Poseidon and sea creatures
F 779, 782, 730, 783, 894, 787
27 2015

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) Warriors F 588, 847 B




) Horse leader, horse
F 557, 566




20. Column Shaft with Figurative Reliefs So-called Columna Caelata

On the front of the Archaic temple of Apollo in Didyma were marble columns like the ones in the famous temple of Artemis in Ephesos decorated above the base with representations of young women in high relief. Both fragments belonged to the same marble column. On the larger fragment one can discern traces of ancient colour
Didyma (Turkey), temple of Apollo
From the division of find 1912/1914
Marble, 540 - 530 BC
Sk 1721
27 2015

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21. Column Shaft with Figurative Reliefs So-called Columna Caelata

On the front of the Archaic temple of Apollo in Didyma were marble columns like the ones in the famous temple of Artemis in Ephesos decorated above the base with representations of young women in high relief. Both fragments belonged to the same marble column. On the larger fragment one can discern traces of ancient colour
Didyma (Turkey), temple of Apollo
From the division of find 1912/1914
Marble, 540 - 530 BC
Sk 1748
27 2015

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22. Statue of an Offerings-bearer

The larger-than-life statue represents the type of the nude youth (Kouros), the typical image of men in the Archaic age. He held a sacrificial animal in front of his chest, which was attached to a rusticated block with plugs. A right hand holding the rear legs of a ram or a calf has been attributed to it
Didyma (Turkey), sanctuary of Apollo
From the division of find 1911
Marble, 530 - 520 BC
Sk 1710
27 2015




23. Lion of Miletus

The lion, the heraldic animal of Miletus, can be frequently found among the votive offerings and tomb sculptures of the city. In their early renditions of lions, the Milesian sculptors were strongly influenced by Egyptian models. The excellently preserved Berlin lion and its counterpart guarded the tomb of a local noble family
Miletus (Turkey), so-called Lion-Tomb at the Kazartepe
Marble, 560 - 550 BC
Sk 1790
27 2015




24. Funeral Statue of a Woman, So-called Berlin Goddess

Although this sculpture became world-famous as Berlin Goddess, it probably does not represent a divine being. Instead, what we see is the funerary statue of a woman from a wealthy family appearing as the bride of the god of the underworld, Hades. Her social status is emphasised by the magnificent bright red garment
Keratea (Attica/GR), acquired on the art market in 1924
Marble, 580 - 560 BC
SA 1800
27 2015

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