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27 2015

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26. Head of Athena in the Velletri Type on a Modern Bust

The head with the Corinthian helmet belongs to a series of Roman copies made after a colossal statue of Athena from around 400 BC. The best ancient version from Velletri (Italy) is in the Louvre in Paris. The goddess held spear in her raised right and probably a sacrificial bowl in her left hand
Acquired by Frederick II in 1742
Marble, Roman, after an original from around 400 BC
SA 79
27 2015

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27. Head of Singing or Talking Dionysus

The head of Dionysus is one of several ancient copies, of which the Head from the South Slope of the Athenian Acropolis counts as the most excellent. The statuary type belonging to it could not be established until now. The model may have been a famous Early Hellenistic statue in the Athenian sanctuary of Dionysus
Acquired in 1842 from the Riccardi Coll., Florence (I)
Marble, Roman, after an original from 270 - 250 BC
Sk 610
27 2015

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28. Theseus Plunges Sciron into the Sea

Vulci (Italy), acquired in Rome in 1833
Clay, around 480 BC; drinking bowl, painter Douris (attributed to)
F 2288
27 2015




29. Theseus Stabs the Minotaur

Nola (Italy), acquired in 1878
Clay, around 460 BC; neck amphora, Attic red-figure
F 2343
27 2015




30. Amphora: Achilles and Aias Playing a Board Game, Departure of Athena

Acquired in 1962
Clay, around 510 BC, Attic black-figure, Chiusi Painter
In a battle break during the Trojan war, we see the two great Greek heroes, Achilles and Aias, immersed in board game. The presence of Athena as the supporter of Achilles establishes the connection to the rear side, on which the goddess mounts her chariot in the presence of Dionysus
Inv. 1962.28
27 2015

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31. Drinking Cup of the Potter Sosias: Achilles Binds Patroclus

Vulci (Italy), necropolis Camposcala, acquired in 1831
Clay, around 500 BC, Attic red-figure
The inside of this masterpiece of Attic vase painting displays a picture from the Trojan War: Achilles, skilled in the art of healing, binds his friend Patroclus, who is suffering great pain. The outer sides display an assembly of gods on Mount Olympus, to which Athena introduces her protege Herakles after his death
F 2278
27 2015

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32. Drinking Cup of the Foundry Painter: Handing Over Weapons for Achilles

Vulci (Italy), acquired in 1837
Clay, around 490/480 BC, Attic red-figure
The scene on the inside of the drinking cup leads us to the workshop of the god of blacksmiths, Hephaestus: He hands Thetis the weapons he made for her son, Achilles. The images on the outside give insight into a bronze foundry, where two statues are being made. The anonymous Athenian painter owes his name to this vase
F 2294
27 2015

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33. Statuette of the Leaning Aphrodite

Tarquinia (Italy), acquired in 1857
Marble, 420 - 400 BC
The very feminine figure of Aphrodite stands next to a pronouncedly archaizing idol in the shape of a woman against which she leans with her elbow. Sculptures, vase paintings and literary sources provide evidence that depictions of the love goddess in a casually leaning posture was highly popular in Athenian Classical art
27 2015




34. Drinking Cup of Oltos: The Death of Patroclus

Vulci (Italy), acquired in 1841 from the Coll. Canino
Clay, around 510 BC, Attic red-figure
The outer side narrate a central episode from the Trojan War, the fight between Aias and the Trojan Aineias for the corps of Patroclus. On the opposite side, the news of his death is brought to Achilles, who is talking to aged Nestor. The cup was made by the potter Euxitheos and painted by Oltos
F 2264
27 2015

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35. Head of Artemis or Apollo

Athens (Greece), acquired in 1844
Marble, 330 - 300 BC
The high-quality head was meant to be mounted onto a monumental statue and could stem from a cult image. Due to its effeminate traits, the hairstyle and the pierced earlobes, it counted as female and was thus associated with Artemis. Yet all mentioned traits can also be found as Apollo
Sk 616
27 2015




36. Statue of a Wounded Niobid

Rome (Italy), acquired in 1958
Marble, 440 - 430 BC
A hint at the interpretation of this figure is provided by the hole in the right part of the chest, in which a bronze arrow may have been inserted. We are familiar with similar representations from statuary groups, in which Apollo and Artemis take deadly revenge on Niobe and her children, the Niobids, for offering their mother Leto
Inv. 1958.1
27 2015

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37. Statue of a Victor, So-called Berlin Athlete

Acquired by Frederick II in Rome in 1768
Marble, Roman after an original from ca. 320/310 BC
The roman copy goes back to a Greek bronze original dating from 320 to 310 BC, possibly a statue in honour of a victorious athlete, and can be connected with the work of the famous sculptor Lysippos of Sicyon. The right lower arm and the hand with the ointment flask were added in modern time
Sk 471
27 2015

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38. Cup with Inscription: Javelin Throwers

Vulci (Italy), acquired in 1960
Clay, around 465 BC, Attic red-figure, Pistoxenos Painter
Inv.1960.2
27 2015




39. Cup: Athlete, Ready to Throw the Javelin

Vulci (Italy), acquired shortly after 1867
Clay, around 440/430 BC, Attic red-figure
F 2728
27 2015

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40. Cup: Landing Long Jumper with Jumping Weights

Tarquinia (Italy), acquired 1831
Clay, around 510/500 BC, Attic red-figure. Painter of Berlin 2268
F 2268
27 2015




41. Cup: Hoplite Runner

Tarquinia (Italy), acquired 1831
Clay, around 490 BC, Attic red-figure. Antiphon Painter
F 2307
27 2015




42. Athlete with Victory Fillet

Sparta (Greece), acquired in 1896
Bronze, around 450 BC Bronze sculptures of Athletes, 5th and 4th Century BC
The representation of athletes was popular in various fields of art. Bronze statues and atatuettes of athletes were donated in sanctuaries as votive of ferings by victorious athletes. Moreover, figurines of athletes adorned implements and vessels
Misc. 8576
27 2015




43. Boy with Ball

Ligourio (Greece), acquired in 1888
Bronze, around 460 BC
Bronze sculptures of Athletes, 5th and 4th Century BC
The representation of athletes was popular in various fields of art. Bronze statues and atatuettes of athletes were donated in sanctuaries as votive of ferings by victorious athletes. Moreover, figurines of athletes adorned implements and vessels
Misc. 8089
27 2015




44. Athlete or Hoplite Runner

Taurus Mountains (Turkey), acquired in 1913
Bronze, around 480 BC
Bronze sculptures of Athletes, 5th and 4th Century BC
The representation of athletes was popular in various fields of art. Bronze statues and atatuettes of athletes were donated in sanctuaries as votive of ferings by victorious athletes. Moreover, figurines of athletes adorned implements and vessels
Inv. 30209
27 2015




45. Head of a Victors Statue in the Type of the Dresden Boy

Acquired in 1865 from the Collection Pourtales
Marble, Roman, after an original from around 430/420 BC
This head probably goes back to bronze victors statue of a young athlete by the sculptor Polykleitos of Argos or his school. In Olympia, the victorious athletes were allowed to set up such statues in their honour. The boy preserved Roman copy at the Dresden Antiquities Collection gave this type of statue its name
27 2015

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46. Panathenaic Prize Amphora with Boxing Match

Vulci (Italy), acquired in 1835
Clay, Attic black-figure, around 490 BC
These oil-filled prize amphorae were given to the victorious athletes at the Panathenaic Games, the main festival of the citys patron goddess Athena held every four years. One side shows the competition during which the prize was won, the other depict the armed Athena Promachos between two columns
F 1833
27 2015

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47. Bronze Statue of a Young Man, So-called Praying Boy

Rhodes (Greece), acquired in 1747
Bronze, around 300 BC
This statue was found already in the Renaissance and passed through many collections before it was acquired by Frederick II. Its missing arms are imaginatively amended and give the statue its name. As regards its style, it is attributed to the school of the sculptor Lysippos of Sicyon. Set up on this very site since 1830, it constituted the signet of the Collection of Classical Antiquities
Sk 2
27 2015




48. Calyx Krater with Palaestra Scenes Attributed to Euphronios

Capua (Italy), acquired in 1878
Clay, Attic red-figure, around 500 BC
Both front and reverse side of this vessel for mixing vine with water depict preparations for athletic training or competition: Undressing, oiling, massage and discus training. Kalos inscriptions give the name of the young Athenians, amongst them Leagros and Antiphon. The masterly painted vessel is considered to be the work of the Athenian painter and potter Euphronios
F 2180
27 2015

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49. Hetaera Above the Chamber Pot

Orvieto (Italy), acquired in Paris in 1901
Clay, around 480 BC; cup, Attic red-figure, in the style of the Foundry Painter
V.I. 3757
27 2015

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50. Flutist in front of a Food Basket

Acquired in Paris in 1892
Clay, around 480 BC; cup, Attic red-figure, attributed to the painter Douris
V.I. 3255
27 2015





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